Thursday, August 28, 2014

At Dusk

The soft top folded neatly down,
The air hung heavy all around,
The moist air bubbled from the ground.

I choose passenger with a shrug,
The contoured seat gave me a hug,
These drives are escapes, a legal drug.

We greeted the Texas back roads,
And pounded out pavement Morse codes, 
Experienced a foreign zip code. 

But as the horizon cycled by,
I became aware of my probing eye,
Adjusting to the dim, slate black sky.

No more concerned with Earthly things,
My mind rose on soft, dainty wings,
Focus there relieved life’s stings.

Air streamed past my trance-like face,
I came unglued from this Texas place,
Reconnected with my first love…space.

There among the stagnant stars,
Flew a flash of light most bizarre, 
Pure bright, not a bit tinted like Mars. 

We accelerated, as did she, 
Different planes, yet commonality, 
Meeting each other had set us free. 

Simple tour with profound progress,
Satisfied a hunger, I confess,
At dusk we raced the I-S-S.

From here. 

Friday, August 22, 2014

Friday Free for All

It's Friday, and it's been a long week! This Nerdy April is ready for the weekend, but first a few gems from my phone this past week:

The grad school gods shown on Chris, he received his diploma!!! So proud!

Gus Grissom, the cat, has been sleeping in these weird positions lately. Or trying kitty yoga...maybe it's the sun salute cat style? Also, it could be the "please don't look at, pet, or generally bug me" position. 

And finally, there have been a ton of turtles in the ponds at work lately. This guy was straight chillin' when I walked by the other day ;-)

Thursday, August 14, 2014

NASA: 13 months + 6 days

I'm starting to sound like a proud mom spewing out toddler stats. But yes, its officially been 13 months and 6 days since I began this journey at NASA to become an Attitude Determination and Control Officer. So what have I been up to and how do I feel about it? Glad you asked. Ha.

And if you didn't, I'm gunna tell you anyway.

I have now completed all of my technical "knowledge capture" (in NASA terms), which means I successfully passed an 8 hour long oral exam with questions coming from my entire time here at NASA (exhausting). I also finished mini sim 19 out of 25 this week, and next week I will dabble in the next type of simulations, called "Integrated Sims". This type of sim is as close to the real thing as you can get, read: real Flight Director, real Russians, and all disciplines represented.

These are all the "technical specs" of where I am in training, but working at NASA is so much more than technical information. It is the culmination of years of hard work, determination, and motivation; and day-to-day I learn self confidence, problem solving and teamwork. I am constantly challenged to soak up information and present new ideas. My peers are all of those "super smart" kids in school, and somehow they allowed me access into their exclusive club. I feel absolutely honored.

Today I had a chance to OJT (on-the-job-training) in FCR-1. I didn't do much, in fact I pretty much just sat there and asked my mentor questions, followed along as we completed a reboost, and hawked the data like my life depended on it (this is what you do in sims because they throw everything and the kitchen sink at you). I got to see the astronauts doing their work and the flight control team doing theirs. And in the midst of all that, I made my official NASA TV debut. I'll be signing autographs later ;-)

Front left, where all pilots should be, including this ISS pilot ;-)
Trying to soak it all in!!
What I wore: polka dot dress with stretchy belt and mary janes. #missioncontrolstyle

Monday, August 4, 2014

What I Want, What I Really Really Want

Wow. There has been so much talk in the Diabetes Online Community recently about bypassing the FDA and creating "right now" solutions to Diabetes management. The "We are Not Waiting" crowd is using a mashup of CGM (continuous glucose monitoring) and smartwatch technology to remotely monitor young kids at school. I'm not a parent, but I can imagine that my thirst for number knowledge would have me cooking up something similar - in fact, I "designed" this type of cloud system on paper for my "Entrepreneurship for Engineers" course in undergrad. 

I have been thinking a lot about what I want my Diabetes Management resources to look like. As a wannabee runner I have ample time to dream up possibilities and analyze the feasibility. So, Dexcom, if you're out there...I would like to present my simple solution. It's not cloud based (although it could be) or reinventing the wheel. In my opinion its beautifully simple. And could be deployed in two phases if need be. 

My largest complaint about the Dexcom system is the receiver. It makes a weird lump in my pants pocket and is not easily accessible, like I feel this kind of data should be. [You didn't really think I would wear it on my belt in that weird case did you?] So, all I want is an option. Stuff all of those "receiver" parts into a watch. A sexy watch (like pebble), that lights up via touch technology for a quick glance whenever I want it. No more digging in my pocket, sometimes under a seat belt, to acknowledge the hi/low alarms. I want to be able to run and see my numbers while running unlike the current config where I have to stop running, fish CGM out of my running pocket, check it, fish it back in, and finally continue running (I've also tried to rig up an armband, but its equally frustrating and fashion-wise lame). When we order the CGM system, give us an option: regular old receiver (I'm sure there is a population who loves it already) or watch. The best part for you? This system cuts out the "cloud based middleman" ...no cellphone required and no complicated new technology, it's all stuff you are already giving us just in a different form. 


Phase 2: collaborate to design a meter that automatically sends finger stick readings to the receiver for calibration. We would love you long time. 

In summary, build us a watch that requires touch instead of physical exertion, that lights up or vibrates for the "alarms", that gives us much more situation awareness in a shorter amount of time...and all it requires is to design a new "case" for all those receiver parts. 

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

F-I-Dubs

...In other words: how every Diabetic is suited to be a flight controller.

You, yes you. You got the 'beetus? Don't feel down, little did you know you practice essential flight controller skills every.single.day.

Lets step back a little bit. Almost as soon as I commandeered my shiny new NASA badge and clumsily found my desk someone uttered those words, "FIW...Failure, Impact, Workaround."

"Well that's clever," I thought. I had no idea how many times I would hear those three letters.
Honestly, its probably on the order of a dozen times a day.
Its the buzzword, err, letters at NASA.
I'm surprised I haven't seen a tattoo yet.

As I progressed through my knowledge capture 'FIW' became a useful vocabulary word. I used those three letters to practice telling imaginary Flight Directors how new failures I learned about would 'impact' the system and what I was cooking up as a 'workaround'. It became so ingrained that I began thinking about everyday malfunctions as opportunities to practice 'FIW' much to my husband's annoyance.

But I realized something.

Whether consciously or not, I am constantly 'FIW-ing' situations surrounding my Type 1 Diabetes. I would venture to say that most, if not all of us, PWDs (Persons With Diabetes) use FIW all the time (holy acronym soup batman).

Example: Out to dinner and 'Low Reservoir' alarm rings on pump.
Failure: Low insulin levels in pump.
Impact: Possibility of running out of insulin before making it back home, especially since I am out to dinner.
Workarounds: (1)Eat less, (2) pull out backup insulin pen, or (3) site change materials, (4) do nothing and hope to get home before insulin runs out.

Sometimes its not so cut and dry...

Example: Ready to workout but blood sugar check shows 100 mg/dL.
Failure: Potential for going low while working out.
Impact: Abort workout, symptoms of low blood sugar, medical attention.
Workarounds: (1)Wait to workout until number increases from a swig of OJ, (2) skip workout, (3) take pump off or suspend.

Diabetes is a continuous FIW thought process. One 'F' can lead to a variety of 'I's', and there may be several 'Ws' in any situation. While I often curse Diabetes, I can honestly say its given me more practice with the 'FIW' process than anything else in my life. I feel confident in my abilities to think outside the box for 'Ws' because, let's be honest, we've all been in that sticky Diabetes situation that required a creative solution.

So, what does all this mean? We would all make great flight controllers! Whose ready to join me at NASA?!

Monday, July 28, 2014

#Zuberselfie

 My parents took some time out of their very busy schedules to visit us this past weekend! 
It was fast, but fun...and we took some selfies. 
Love you guys to pieces!!





PS: sorry for the sparse posting... I promise, a more informative update is coming soon ;-) 
#gottafinishPARKSANDREConNetflix
#jk

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Catching Up

"I write because I don't know what I think until I read what I say." - Flannery O'Connor

As much as I tout my "adventures" on this blog, I am really such a homebody. I like being at my house, curling up in a homemade blanket, planting flowers, practicing piano, cuddling with the dogs, even doing chores. I like being at home with Chris, making him dinner, laughing at stupid shows. There is just something about home that does it for me. 

And speaking of "home"...ours has been full lately with Chris's family. So much shopping, so much gardening, so much interaction. And after they left this morning I realized I'm ready for a few days in our standard configuration - me doing chores and studying and Chris finishing up his schoolwork. We need to relax.  

So, what else has been happening on the Nerdy April front? Well, not much really, except that I had my lowest A1c evaaaa: 6.2. I was literally over the moon, but my endo thought it was a "skewed" reading from too many lows. She didn't have any proof of this theory though and proceeded to ask me to do 2am finger sticks. I spoke up, "I have a CGM, it vibrates if I go over my low/high thresholds, plus I can see the trend while I was asleep." "Really? It does that?" she asked. Ok lady, I have literally explained this to you at every.single.one of our previous appointments. Wiki it or something. Anyway, I was excited and sent this pic to Chris:


In unrelated news, we bough two mattresses at Sam's for Chris's old bunk bed. It's a little unclear to me why we even have said bunk beds (we have 2 guestrooms already), but I was out voted and so the mystery shall never be debunked (see what I did there?).


And finally, thanks Houston pollution for these gorgeous sunsets lately. Everything is bigger in Texas, including our risk of getting cancer [sarcasm...maybe...unverified].